STDs in the Pacific and elsewhere: some essential research papers to review

Most of these have free text available via the PUBMED link and come from projects lead by PNGIMR and the Kirby and Burnet Institutes.  Remember as well to use the WHO STD Laboratory Manual as your microbiological study reference for these diseases and their diagnosis.  If you have trouble getting the full papers, please contact me.

  • A novel point-of-care testing strategy for sexually transmitted infections among pregnant women in high-burden settings: results of a feasibility study in Papua New Guinea. BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Jun 6;16:250. doi: 10.1186/s12879-016-1573-4.

The utility of the GenXpert platform for diagnosis of a range of STDs is apparent. 

  • Prevalence and risk factors of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis and other sexually transmissible infections among women attending antenatal clinics in three provinces in Papua New Guinea: a cross-sectional survey . Sex Health. 2016 Oct;13(5):420-427. doi: 10.1071/SH15227.
  • Prevalence and risk factors for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis infection in pregnant women in Papua New Guinea. Sex Transm Infect. 2015 May;91(3):194-200. doi: 10.1136/sextrans-2014-051670. Epub 2014 Oct 13.
  • Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian Regions, 2009. Commun Dis Intell Q Rep. 2011 Mar;35(1):2-7.

An important issue for laboratories in the Pacific – we need to ensure that culture methods are in place and that regular surveys of antimicrobial susceptibility take place- this enables appropriate guidelines to be put in place for drug supply and treatment. 

The utility of routine testing of self-collected anorectal samples, even in clients who do not admit to anal intercourse. 

  • Dorsal longitudinal foreskin cut is associated with reduced risk of HIV, syphilis and genital herpes in men: a cross-sectional study in Papua New Guinea. J Int AIDS Soc. 2017 Apr 3;20(1):21358.

“In this large cross-sectional study, men with a dorsal longitudinal foreskin cut were significantly less likely to have HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis compared with uncut men, despite still having a complete (albeit morphologically altered) foreskin. …Exposure of the penile glans and inner foreskin appear to be key mechanisms by which male circumcision confers protection.”

About mdjkf

Microbiologist and Infectious Diseases Physician
This entry was posted in Fiji, Module - STDs, PNG, Public health, Vanuatu. Bookmark the permalink.

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